Newsletter Archive

Department News

Distinguished Alumnus Award

Nominations are now open for the Department of Horticultural Science Distinguished Alumnus Award. This award will honor an alumnus/alumna who has attained professional distinction in horticultural science as evidenced by outstanding professional achievement on a state, national, or international level. Nominations due June 15, 2017.

Stefanie Dukowic-Schulze, right

Stefanie Dukowic-Schulze has been a researcher in Changbin Chen’s lab since 2011. Originally from southern Germany near Heidelberg, Dukowic-Schulze has published 10 papers in her time with the U of M and given presentations on her research around the world. Read her Q&A.

Precision Control: Engineering a Multi-Partition Growth Chamber

When traditional growth chambers can't quite cut it, you've got to be ready to get your hands dirty. Researcher Calvin Peters engineered specialized multi-partition growth chambers that can control almost any aspect of a plant’s environment—allowing for more precise measurements and better-controlled experiments than with traditional growth chambers.

3rd Floor Lobby Redesign

Thank you to everyone who donated to our crowd funding campaign to renovate the lobby last December. Thanks to all our alumni, staff, faculty, and even current students we raised nearly $30,000 towards the lobby. A special thank you goes to Emily Hoover, Jim Luby, and Neil Anderson, who matched the donations from the crowd funding campaign.

It costs as much as $140 million for Monsanto to release a new genetically modified crop, and from start to finish Angela Hendrickson Culler (Ph.D. Plant Biological Sciences ’07) ensures that crop is safe for people, animals, and the environment. Culler is the lead for Monsanto’s U.S. Biotech Regulatory Affairs department and was recently named one of the Saint Louis Business Journal’s 40 Under 40, which recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to their businesses and community. She manages a team of 25 people and is responsible for obtaining and maintaining global regulatory approvals for a $10 billion product portfolio.

Since its release in 1991, Honeycrisp has been harboring a secret: its parents are a mystery. Originally billed as the child of Macoun and Honeygold, researchers quickly discovered that neither of these varieties were the parents of Minnesota’s favorite apple. Now, 26 years after its introduction, graduate student Nick Howard (Applied Plant Sciences, Ph.D.) has finally uncovered Honeycrisp’s true lineage.

The third floor atrium is a hub of activity for Alderman Hall. This area is a popular spot to study, hold impromptu meetings, eat lunch, or wait for classes to begin — but it is sorely in need of updates and a redesign. Your support can help us create a more welcoming and functional space for building users. Our vision includes an expanded seating area and a flexible design to allow for a variety of uses.

Gifts up to $10,000 will be matched—doubling your impact. Give today!

Bailey Nurseries, a fifth-generation family-owned company, has been involved with the department for decades. They have provided plants for the display garden, scholarships for graduate and undergraduate students, and supported conferences hosted on campus. On October 6, the Bailey family was invited to campus to thank them for their myriad of contributions.

Science does not happen at the University of Minnesota without support from intersecting industries. This support can take many forms, such as directly working with a company to release a new variety of plant into the market, or the industry lobbying to get public funding for a research area. Other times these relationships are more tangential, formed when the research experience at the University compliments the needs of an organization that may or may not have plants as its end product.

The greenhouse at North Community High School is a small space, just big enough to fit the 10 students in Mr. Vreeland’s 11th and 12th grade science class. Five years ago this space was just one more unused room in a school facing the cutting block. Today it is the apex of an initiative around youth development and urban agriculture in North Minneapolis, led by the University of Minnesota, social justice non-profit organization Project Sweetie Pie, and North High.

Pages

Have a Story?

We’re always looking for new stories to include in our alumni newsletter. If you’re a current member of the department or an alumnus and you’re doing something interesting, tell us about it by emailing Thomas Roselyn at troselyn@umn.edu.